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Sidelock
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We see many in town and a few in the fields. They can be spotty with one locale having quite a few and a couple of miles away none.

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Need to get bigger strips of bacon for those larger breast on the grill.

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We have them up here in Eastern Iowa as well. They mix right in with the Mourning Doves. I feed'em well into the Winter, until we finally get a real Arctic blast that sends them all south.


I prefer wood to plastic, leather to nylon, waxed cotton to Gore-Tex, and split bamboo to graphite.
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Saw and shot a lot more Euros in Yuma this year than last. Generally a lot bigger than whitewings and much slower flyers than either mourning or whitewing. No aerobatics, just basically straight line flight with slower wingbeat. Shot one bird that I put into my mourning dove pile and when I started to clean the birds I noticed a faint collar and odd wing color. It appears that there is some interbreeding going on.

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Colorado has them and they tend to winter-over here. As has been mentioned previously, they seem to avoid the more-rural areas (with a few exceptions) and hang around suburbia where they can't be (legally) hunted. They are not impervious to air-guns, however. Year-round sport if you're so-inclined. So-far, I haven't been. They remind me too much of pigeons.

Last edited by Lloyd3; 09/08/14 06:23 PM.
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There are some who think it may be trying to fill the niche left by the Passenger Pigeon. Quite possibly the most numerous warm blooded species the planet has ever known; wiped out by man.

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Sidelock
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We have plenty here in E Texas, in fact have had a nesting couple in an oak tree in the yard.

I first became acquainted with them back in 1972-74 when I was stationed over in Izmir, Turkey while in the USAF. We had plenty in town, and in the fall we would go just outside town, around the bay to some granaries and they were so thick you could burn up two or 3 boxes of shells in a matter of minutes, and come home with a good bag. They were very tasty.


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They are largely 'town birds' as others have stated, but they will also nest in rural areas around farms and such. For sporting opportunities its probably best to find where they are going to feed and once those areas are located then you can position yourself for some good pass shooting between 'town' & the feeding fields w/o overly disturbing the birds. Where there are large concentrations, they act like feral pigeons and tend to fly in flocks.

BTW, they are larger than a white wing & they eat just fine. Leave at least one wing feathered until you get home; it eliminates any hassle or question about what kind of dove it is that way should you ever get checked, year round.

When grilling breasted birds, try a thin slice of onion inserted next to the breast bone on each side, half a jalapeno seeded & pithed stuck down between the onion slices and a bacon wrap. Skewer 'em up about four to a metal shish kabob or pre-soaked bamboo stick on a hot covered grill. Stick one dry tooth pick in one of the breasts and use it as a thermometer; when the tooth pick is burnt pull the birds, they are done. That method works equally well on mourning dove, white wings & euros.

kind regards, tw

Last edited by tw; 09/09/14 07:28 PM. Reason: added 'stuck down'
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Quote:
When grilling breasted birds, try a thin slice of onion inserted next to the breast bone on each side, half a jalapeno seeded & pithed stuck down between the onion slices and a bacon wrap. Skewer 'em up about four to a metal shish kabob or pre-soaked bamboo stick on a hot covered grill. Stick one dry tooth pick in one of the breasts and use it as a thermometer; when the tooth pick is burnt pull the birds, they are done. That method works equally well on mourning dove, white wings & euros.

And drizzle them with a little teriyaki just before they come off the grill. Plate with a bit of ginger and a sprinkle of cilantro, maybe a few toasted sesame seeds.

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Originally Posted By: Replacement
Generally a lot bigger than whitewings and much slower flyers than either mourning or whitewing. Shot one bird that I put into my mourning dove pile and when I started to clean the birds I noticed a faint collar and odd wing color. It appears that there is some interbreeding going on.


Originally Posted By: tw
BTW,they are larger than a white wing


The Eurasian dove and the white wing dove we have shot for years here in Utah and in Arizona both are generally the same size. The adult white wing is often larger. The Eurasian dove has longer tail feathers. For body size here and in Arizona, both are the same, if both are adult birds and not half breeds.

White-winged Doves are large, plump doves at 29 cm (11 in). Most populations of White-winged Doves are migratory, wintering in Mexico and Central America.

Eurasian is a medium sized dove, distinctly smaller than the wood pigeon, similar in length to a rock pigeon but slimmer and longer-tailed , and slightly larger than the related turtle dove, with an average length of 32 cm (13 in) from tip of beak to tip of tail. Juveniles differ in having a poorly developed collar, and a brown iris.

The collared dove is not wary and often feeds very close to human habitation and often the largest populations are typically found around farms where spilt grain is frequent around grain stores or where livestock are fed. It is a gregarious species and sizeable winter flocks will form where there are food supplies such as grain (its main food) as well as seeds, shoots and insects. Flocks most commonly number between ten and fifty, but flocks of up to ten thousand have been recorded.





Doug



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