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Joined: Apr 2005
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Sidelock
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Sidelock
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I wonder if any of you have an easy surefire method for correctly aligning the stock bolt hole orientation in a new stock blank ?
Done wrongly it can result in a scrapped piece of expensive wood .
As an example I just looked at a Perazzi stock , a hole drilled/bored 12" through the stock , at the butt end there is a hole 3/4" diameter to accomodate bolt head socket , this is 6" deep so the next 6" of depth is 3/8" diameter to accomodate a 1/4" or 6mm stock bolt .
The Butt end is 5" depth and the 3/4" hole is bored 2&3/4" from the toe of the stock & 2&1/4" from the heel . The bolt protrudes through the stock hole at the head by about 1" down from the comb .
NOW ! How do they do that ? With a jig ? A prayer ?
It would be nice to hear from an expert stocker on what method they use .
Thank you all.

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Sidelock
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I use a gun drill and put the blank in my milling vise, drill 1/2 way, flip the blank and repeat. Gun drills run very straight and this method has proved very successful for me.

I built a pantograph as well and when I run a through hole stock I bore the hole in the blank beforehand and it is that hole that becomes the axis on which I set up my machine. Good patterns with the hole exactly where you want it is the result.

I hope that helps.

Steve


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The only way I have found that works is what SKB calls a gun drill. Mine were made with a jobber length drill bit welded onto a rod of the exact same size. It requires frequent pulling it back to clean the wood bits as the hole goes deeper. A true gun drill has just a small channel milled into the rod and is sharpened like a drill bit with only a single flute. The drill from both ends is a way hide any drift in an area with the most material to work with.

It takes me a long time to drill a stock bolt hole. I am going 1/4”-3/8” or so at a time, then cleaning out and repeating over and over again. But you do not get more than the slightest drifting any. I have more time than good blanks and nothing will ruin your day like screwing up a nice blank.

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Yes I use a true gun drill for this job with a single channel in the rod, they are much stiffer and less prone to wander than a twist bit is.


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salopian,
Production stocks would be drilled in a special setup for that operation and would include a jig and maybe multi diameter drills. For a "one off", I would do it in a lathe, between centers( or rather between the tailstock center and a drill in the headstock). I would use a gundrill as described, made long enough to reach over halfway through the stock. If your blank stock comes with the pistol grip end including a square section, do not cut this off or you will have a lot more work to establish the center when the pantograph's center would have been obvious. I would drill this hole first then turn the blank " end for end", as described by SKB, and drill the other end to meet the first hole. This is a preference and starting at the butt end will work also. I suggest making the gundrill long enough to start with, rather than extending a shorter one. While others would no doubt differ, I would use the slowest turning lathe( in my case, 28 rpm) and "dog" the stock by hand, so I could let it spin, if it "hangs up" .
Mike
The way I was taught to make a "gundrill" for stock work is to heat and flatten a rod (size to correct diameter), file two flutes with a channel in each side that cross each other at the center, with the leading edge of each flute doing the cutting. This type is also slow and requires clearing frequently. If you intend to use it for a lot of stocks, you could harden it.
Mike

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I inlet my action in the correct location in the blank and using a point made with the right sized bolt sharpened make a mark the wood with the action . I then mark the other end of the blank where I want the bolt hole to start. I then put a sharpened piece of rod in my 4 way drill press vise and the right sized bit in the drill press vise. I use a foresner bit for the bigdiameter hole because they are very stiff and don't wander. When I get to the right depth I switch drill bits using the point mark left by the forsner bit as my starting point and drill till I meet the action side starting point. This takes a lot of adjusting for depth on the drill press.

bill

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The welding to get the extension-- should be the TIG process, using D-2 (drill rod) for the extension to the bit--RWTF


When The Man In Black Comes Around- Rev: 6-8
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Salopian this type of problem was solved way back in the past well before the lathe was a twinkle in Mr Maudsley's eye, at a cost of a few pounds/dollars because you do not need to throw money at this problem. you will require a three inch square piece of timber about four foot long. Eight inches of steel tubing with a half to three quarters hole, two pieces of timber about a foot long three inches wide and one to one and a half inches thick. One six by three quarter inch steel bolt and finally one carpenters six inch clamp failing that two three inch no 10 wood screws. finally a one six inch nail
The how! What we are going to make is a drilling gig of the simplest type. from the three inch square wood cut two six inch pieces at least one end of each piece must be cut square to all sides, if you do not do a good cutting job adjust with a file rasp or abrasive paper and check with a square. Put some effort in to one of the pieces because this is going to be the head stock of your jig and the hole you will put through must be parallel to this. Taking your head stock piece drill a hole two inches from the top in the center to accommodate your length of tubing, it is very important this hole is at right angles to the base. To keep the tube from sliding in the hole apply some Epoxy Adhesive. Now we will fix this piece with the tube to one end of your long length of timber using Epoxy Adhesive because this also fills op any slight gaps making a firm fixing, make sure the tube is facing along the length of the timber. When the Epoxy has set drill a tight clearance hole through the bottom piece of timber into the head stock piece to add rigidity. The movable tail stock end is far simpler to make, firstly glue and screw your three inch block to one end of your three by one to one and a half inch timber. Your other piece of three by one or one and a half is fitted to one side of the bottom piece of three inch square timber standing proud by an inch to act as a fence to keep your tail stock parallel to the head stock. finally push tour tail stock up yo the tube now drill a hole through the tail stock to accommodate your bolt having first ground a tapered center then glue in place making sure this lines up well with your guide tube.
To use the gig clamp the bottom section of the gig in a vice decide on the drill size you want to use and make a couple of drill bushes to allow the drill to run concentric in the tube (I have used strips of a tin can to make temporary bushes well greased) center punch your stock or blank at each end in the correct places, now for the tube end you drill a shallow hole to accommodate the end of the tube tightly. now mount your stock or blank between the guide tube a d the tail stock center clamping the tail stock to the base using a carpenters clamp or just screws. I will say it is a two person job one to cope with the long drill and another to hold the stock or blank to stop it rotating.

This jig for drilling deep holes was not my Idea, they had one of these in the collage I attended for drilling long holes in wooden table lamps and floor standing lamps up to six foot long, though it was built from hardwood and using more steel parts. The version I described was the type I used before I had a lathe and it lasted many years of use

Ernie


The only lessons in my life I truly did learn from where the ones I paid for!
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That is a treasure, Ernie, and thank you for posting it. Is there any possible way for you to take a picture of it? If you'd rather not try to post a pic you can email it to me and I would be glad to do so for you.

Thanks again, SRH


"With one foot in the grave ..........and one foot on the pedal, I was born a Rebel" T.P.
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Sorry Stanton I have owned a Lathe for some forty years now so the boring jig was cut up and the wood put to other uses many years back. If I could have posted a picture I would have done that though I just had to describe the picture I have in my minds eye on how I made it.


The only lessons in my life I truly did learn from where the ones I paid for!
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