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#395217 02/21/15 07:14 PM
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Saw and handled one at a local gun show. 12ga, dealer said it was a C Grade, which was the highest. Some nice game scene engraving, generally quite good condition other than missing an ebony insert in the grip. The hole in the rib extension was neither round like a Greener, nor square like a Scott, nor rectangular like a Fox, Elsie, or NID. Rather, the L and bottom sides were straight, the ends of which were linked by a gentle curve. Different concept.

Large lump fit thrugh the floor plate of the receiver. Nice bores. Barrels gave a rather pronounced "thud" when I tried to ring them. Blued, but I wonder whether they might have been Damascus in disguise. Light gun, shootable dimensions. Might have taken a shot had I not been concerned about the barrels. $950 seemed fairly reasonable.

Anyone know anything about these? First one I've ever handled. I seem to recall an article or two in DGJ, thought I might have saved and filed them, but I did not.

L. Brown #395234 02/21/15 08:53 PM
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Neat guns. There was a Trap grade and a D grade added to the line up, both higher than the C, but a c is certainly a nice gun. I like them.

Marks_21 #395297 02/22/15 12:18 PM
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Baltimore Arms Co. -- January 1900 to October 1904 -- manufactured a gun designed primarily by Frank A. Hollenbeck, covered by his patent #643,601 granted Feb. 13, 1900.

There are three different variations of Baltimore Arms Company doubles, the 1900 Model which was available only in 12-gauge and grades A with twist barrels, B with Damascus barrels, and C with some engraving and a choice of Damascus or steel barrels. Half-pistol grips were standard and the Grade C had the option of straight.

For the 1902 Model they added 16-gauges to the line, repositioned the sear spring and strengthened the protrusions on the toes of the hammers engaged by the cocking slide on the barrel lug. The A-Grade (list price $33) got the option of steel barrels, the B-Grade (list price of $46.50) got some line engraving and a capped full pistol grip, and the C-grade got more game scene and less scroll engraving ("Either half pistol or straight grip.





The half pistol grip has our original finish of ebony inletted in the grip, giving a beautiful finish.") --



Two higher grades the Trap Gun (list price $125) with straight grip, Fluid Steel Barrels ("These barrels are of extra quality and used only on this grade gun.") and engraving of Pigeons and a live Pigeon shooting scene; --



and the Grade D (list price $175) had finest Damascus barrels or Monumental steel barrels (no doubt named for Monumental shooting park in Baltimore), elaborate checkering and dogs on point in the engraving and a partridge.

The 1904 Model got rebates in the frame on each side of the top and bottom tangs and the head of the stock is inlet into these rebates to prevent splitting.



The grades stayed the same but the Grade B got the options of steel barrels and the choice of a straight or capped pistol grip.



Serial numbers I've observed seem to run from about 1000 to a bit over 7,000. 1904 Models seem to begin in the low 5000 range.

Serial numbers under 1000 were those used by the Ansley H. Fox designed gun manufactured by the Fox Gun Co., Balto., Md., U.S.A. Ansley left in early 1900 to become a professional shooter for Winchester and his partners regrouped, incorporated under the laws of West Virginia, and began production of the Hollenbeck designed gun. They moved into a new factory building in 1901, a block or so away from the old Fox premises.

My two-part article on Baltimore Arms Company was in The Double Gun Journal, Volume Ten, Issues 1 & 3. I also had an article "The Fox Gun Company of Baltimore City and Baltimore Arms Company" in The Gun Report, Volume 42, Number 9, February 1997.

Last edited by Researcher; 02/22/15 01:09 PM.
L. Brown #395449 02/23/15 11:16 AM
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Hard to see the engraving in the photos of the top gun, but that one looks like the gun I saw. The ebony inlet in the grip was missing. Otherwise, the gun was in pretty good shape.

L. Brown #395681 02/24/15 07:20 PM
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I am lucky enough to have that issue of DGJ detailing the Baltimore Arms Co. Just from the photographs, I think these are fine guns and in one of my earlier posts I believe you could state that they are rare guns. I will continue to look for one in 12 ga. Most of my old gun store haunts are not even aware of these fine guns

L. Brown #395688 02/24/15 08:48 PM
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Odd placement of the posterior pin for a boxlock. One gun looks like it is a pin, the others look like screws. Superiorly placed too. Intercepting safety sears for that posterior pin? If so, why only one main pin for a boxlock? In other words, where is the pin for the sear arm? Pretty guns.


Socialism is almost the worst.
L. Brown #395695 02/24/15 09:41 PM
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It is truly a shame that when you hold, shoot, collect or just admire vintage American made shotguns you sometime realize they are gone. Parker, Baker, Ithica, Fox, Baltimore Arms, Winchester, Remington, H&R, LC Smith, etc, I could go on and on about fine made American guns. I will certainly give credit to Connecticut Shotgun Mfg. but it would be fantastic to see quality utilitarian doubles and singles being made in the USA. What is that saying , "Wake Up America:".

Buzz #395721 02/25/15 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted By: buzz
Odd placement of the posterior pin for a boxlock. One gun looks like it is a pin, the others look like screws. Superiorly placed too. Intercepting safety sears for that posterior pin? If so, why only one main pin for a boxlock? In other words, where is the pin for the sear arm? Pretty guns.


I don't know the mechanics of a Baltimore Arms gun. But could that pin indicate overhanging sears rather than intercepting sears? I know there's often that question on German guns.

L. Brown #395733 02/25/15 10:20 AM
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All examples that I have seen have a "posterior" screw, and are not pinned; and although I have not personally disassembled a Baltimore gun, I'm almost sure Larry is correct in that this screw secures an overhanging sear in a very similar fashion as the "posterior" pin on the Syracuse Arms gun that Frank Hollenbeck also designed. From my personal observations, any Baltimore gun above Grade B is a hard to find item. I have a Grade C "project" I'll finish someday; a 12-bore. The gun is missing the butt plate, but the stock is un-cut with excellent figure, checkering, and the unique ebony grip cap. The gun frame still has lots of original case color, sharp engraving, and screw slots are untouched and perfect. This gun obviously saw very little use; but some knucklehead cut its beautiful Damascus barrels to 18". I've obtained a great set of 32" fluid steel barrels thru the generosity of Daryl Halquist, as well an excellent set of 28" Twist barrels. The 32" barrels will fit the frame almost perfectly, and the gun will function if I use an extra A Grade forend I have; but until this barrel set is properly fitted, the original C Grade forend is not compatible with the 32" barrels in place. This will be a beautiful gun when properly restored. And based on my limited knowledge of the Baltimore gun, barrel steel names were not marked on barrels tubes themselves (at least on Grades A, B, and C); but one can determine the barrel steel type used (Twist, Damascus, or fluid steel) by inspecting barrel flats. If the barrel tubes are Twist, one will find a "T" stamp thereon, with Damascus barrels a "D" stamp; and fluid steel barrel flats will feature an "S" ID stamp.

topgun #395753 02/25/15 12:28 PM
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Here is the cut-away drawing from the 1900 Baltimore Arms Co. catalogue showing the hanging sear --



By the 1902 Model the sear spring had been repositioned, but all I have of a later catalogue is a photocopy and it just doesn't show up well.

The earliest Baltimore Arms Co. guns had a plain checkered butt plate, as used by the predecessor Fox Gun Co., Balto., MD., U.S.A. By the 1902 Model they were using this butt plate --



I have couple of NOS butt plates that an old Baltimore gunsmith gave me along with some parts when I did a display of the guns at a Maryland Arms Collectors Association show. They are too narrow for any of my 12-gauge guns, but would work on 16-gauges.

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