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Joined: May 2005
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I know this has been discussed ad endless nauseum here, but for the life of me I couldn't find anything ont he search funtion...

What's your favorite method for obtaining an "in the wood" finish? I'm used to a more built up finish that takes 20-30 thin coats, and am having trouble wrapping my head around a non- built-up finish (that happens to me sometimes, my wife says I should write things down more...). Anyway, is it exactly the same but far fewer coats? The same 30 coats, but rubbed all the way down to the wood? Ultra-thinned finish? Other?

I would be interested in any and all thoughts or information on the subject.
Thanks,
Dave

Last edited by David Furman; 05/21/07 08:06 PM.
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Dave, I like either tung oil, or shellac put on by French Polishing. The tung oil is easier, put on as many coats until you have the desired finsih. The French Polishing takes longer but the results are quick. Because you use a tiny drop of oil in the shellac it makes the finish fairly water resistant.
Others here like True Oil, never used it so can't tell you about it. I don't like polyurethane because it you want to refilnish it later, it is hard to remove.


David


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For high use guns I like poly cut 20% with mineral spirits and wiped on like wipeing poly but the result is tough. True oil is fine for hunting guns that don't get a lot of wear. It can start out looking like an old oil finish but it tends to polish out to a high gloss with use.
bill

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David,
I didn't quite understand your question?
Do you want an explanation of how to get an 'in the wood finish' or do you want a quick 'on the wood finish'that looks like an 'in the wood finish'

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IMHO "in the wood" finishes are a fantasy. The only place a finish can get below the surface is in the pores and then it only goes in a few thou. unless you use something like vacuum-pressure impregnation. By the time the solvents evaporate, the remaining resin solids have shrunk and there is even less penetration.

Wood stabilization applicators use a liquid polymer resin that is close to 100% solids and is applied in a vacuum-pressure tank. They can get essentially total fill of all voids with the liquid that does not shrink as it cures. That's about as "in the wood" as you can get, but is a bit beyond the reach of most hobbyists.

The "sanded in" technique is the best I have ever found for pore filling. A thin final layer of finish on top gives what most people call "in the wood", but really isn't.

OB

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Originally Posted By: salopian
David,
I didn't quite understand your question?
Do you want an explanation of how to get an 'in the wood finish' or do you want a quick 'on the wood finish'that looks like an 'in the wood finish'


I'm not sure myself! I'm fishing for general information on what type of finishes and application techniques are out there that will result in either an in the wood finish or something resembling it, so that I can try some out in prep for a gun I'm working on.

I like the look of what I'm calling an "in-the-wood" finish, which to me looks like it's a satin finish that is not built up at all--I see it most often on some Beretta 68X "oil finish" guns, but I really have never even laid eyes on a truly fine oil finish to see what it is supposed to look like. Most of the guns I see with this finish have partly un-filled pores, but I still like the look more than a "built up" finish where you can tell that the finish itself has some thickness to it, and which often glosses up in shine through use.
I do not want to use a true linseed-oil finish nor spend a year applying, waiting, rubbing, etc. I am not necessarily looking for a "shortcut" per se, but am interested in what goes into making a quality in the wood finish, and a quality (if that's possible) 'on the wood finish'that looks like an 'in the wood finish', and what the advantages and disadvantages are of each...

This is to go on a hunting gun that'll see fairly hard use for two months of the year, and rarely used the other 10 months. I've used true-oil on several stocks and find it is hard to get thin enough to avoid building up, and it has not gotten as hard as I would have liked, so buffing it out shows the fine scratches as a slight "haze" on the surface. I'd like to try some other finish, but do not want to have to track down "eye of newt" or any other scarce ingredients to make my own...so an off the shelf finish is what I'm after, and some ideas about how to apply it.
Thanks,
Dave

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OB; If finishing oil can't penetrate the wood, how do so many of these old double stocks get black heads from over oiling and standing in the closet for 40 years.. I've seen some that were pretty well penetrated.. MDC

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Course there is a distinction between face grain and end grain (totally tubular) and end grain is what abutts that over-oiled action, Mel.

Apply a couple coats of Formby's Satin Tung Oil Finish. Don't wait for total cure. Rub each coat out and burnish it down with soft cotton cloth after about 3-4 hrs. under your average incandescant lamp. You'll have sufficient diving face grain and pores to suit you. I always use the gloss Formby's because I like some shine and I get it very easily with a bit of Simichrome Moto Polish on a rag. However I don't particularly care for heavy gloss finishes that have the build to resemble poured Epoxy.

jack


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I can make a few suggestions. I am working on a Zischang style Borchardt stock right now with an "in the wood" finish. I am following, roughly, Steven Dodd Hughes' 3-part article on stock refinishing (which can apply to new wood). In

In short I use Permalyn sealer (an oil/urethane treatment). I fill grain with a slurry of permalyn and rottenstone and then shift to either more permalyn or an equal mix of spar varnish, linseed oil, and turpentine. One can build it up or not.

There is no one way to do any of this. But this works really well for me.


Now, if you ask where that 3-part article was published and how to get a copy, I'm not sure I can tell you any more, but I think it was in Doublegun. I'm certain someone here will know.

Brent


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Dave,
Edit: Brent D posted while I was typing

My 2¢ - I've been using Permalyn Sealer lately. It's very thin and I cut it another ~10% with mineral spirits. Those first couple coats really soak in. Then a coat of pure. It's a modified oil so it's a little shiny, but it's not as glossy as Permalyn Finish or Tru Oil.

Finally wet sand with 1000 or 1200 grit auto body sandpaper. Since you're not obsessed about filling the pores, wipe the stock clean while the mud layer is still wipe-able. You want the stock to be finished after that coat dries. Do a pumice if it needs it.

Last edited by Yeti; 05/22/07 07:59 PM.
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