December
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
Who's Online
8 registered (AZMike, DLA, Ol'Forester, 3 invisible), 6 Guests and 0 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
13925 Members
10 Forums
35090 Topics
492476 Posts

Max Online: 462 @ 08/05/16 09:13 PM
Topic Options
#573619 - 06/10/20 04:57 PM Oil in wood?
Texsss Offline
Boxlock

Registered: 08/27/14
Posts: 19
Gents,

I am cleaning up a stock and I want your opinion on how severe this stock is oil soaked. I did the whiting thing with acetone and it did not seem to draw much out. The wood seems to be very solid and in good shape, but it does have that old smell to it and the head appears kind of black. Should I soak the head? More whiting? What do you think?

Thanks,

Scott





Top
#573629 - 06/10/20 09:00 PM Re: Oil in wood? [Re: Texsss]
Dave in Maine Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 05/04/11
Posts: 1188
Loc: Maine
It wouldn't hurt to do the whiting thing again. You did not say how long you treated this stock with acetone and whiting.

I had a similarly discolored stock that had a little oil in it. I used powdered marble (calcium carbonate, same as whiting) I got from an art supply store, $8 for an 8 lb bag. I put a couple inches of it in a suitably sized cottage cheese tub, put the stock head in it, wrapped it all up (to keep from making a mess in case it was kicked or something) and put it in a warm corner where it was to be undisturbed. After about 2 months, I took the stock head out and vigorously brushed off the powdered marble that adhered, inspected it, then returned it to the powdered marble for another couple months. After about 4 months total, what oil there had been was gone.

You could rush things, but you won't get as good a result.
_________________________
fiery, dependable, occasionally transcendent

Top
#573634 - 06/11/20 12:53 AM Re: Oil in wood? [Re: Texsss]
Kutter Offline
Sidelock
***

Registered: 02/05/02
Posts: 1653
Take a knife blade point and lay it on it's side. Place it on one of the flat surfaces on the inside/inletting of the stock.
Press down with some strength and drag the blade backwards so as NOT to cut into the wood. But instead dragging the blade across the surface will lightly compress & burnish the small area.

If there's oil in the wood, that compressed area will immediately look wet. That's the oil in the wood. You can even soak up a bit with a slip of newsprint,, it's usually that 'wet'.
There will be no doubt when you see it.

Slather on another coating of the whiting powder.
I use plain alcohol instead of acetone to make up the paste.
Using acetone doesn't draw any more oil out of the wood than alcohol does. Acetone evaporates in 10seconds or so anyway.
Alcohol evaporates more slowly so you can brush the stuff in a little more briskly if that matters. It's cheaper,,if that matters.
Do the outside and down in the inletting.

Let the coating set undisturbed for a couple weeks.. at least.
Longer is better.
The tightly clinging shell of whiting hard set against the wood surface is what is needed to draw out the oil.
Hang it somewhere and forget about it. Let it do it's thing.

Top
#573637 - 06/11/20 09:38 AM Re: Oil in wood? [Re: Texsss]
Texsss Offline
Boxlock

Registered: 08/27/14
Posts: 19
Thanks for the replies.

On my journey in working on double guns and in life the hardest "skill" for me to learn is patience.

I will apply the whiting again to the stock and forget about it.

Thanks for your sound advise!

Top
#573677 - 06/12/20 11:24 AM Re: Oil in wood? [Re: Texsss]
keith Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 02/21/08
Posts: 10204
I'm surprised no one mentioned that it helps a great deal to put your stock in a warm place when using absorbent compounds such as whiting or kitty litter to remove oil from the wood. The warmth brings the oil to the surface. Summer is a great time to do this because you can put the stock in a box with a glass top and accomplish this with free solar heating.

I only use solvent soaks as a last resort, and avoid prolonged soaks because solvents such as acetone or lacquer thinner will damage the lignin and cellulose structure of your wood. Once you are satisfied with your de-oiling, you should get your finish on fairly quickly because traces of oil will continue to migrate to the surface. I don't believe it is possible to get all of the oil out of a stock without damaging the wood.
_________________________
A true sign of mental illness is any gun owner who would vote for an Anti-Gunner like Joe Biden.


Top
#573693 - 06/12/20 09:38 PM Re: Oil in wood? [Re: Texsss]
Texsss Offline
Boxlock

Registered: 08/27/14
Posts: 19
Thanks for the tip Keith. I have a truck I don’t drive that often, so I put it in there. That should keep it warm!

Top
#573708 - 06/13/20 12:23 PM Re: Oil in wood? [Re: Texsss]
damascus Offline
Sidelock
***

Registered: 01/27/13
Posts: 889
Loc: Cheshire England
I am sure we have been here many times before. The method I use to remove the oil from a heavily oil soaked gun stock is heat over an extended time with a method of absorbing the oil as it leaves the wood.
I use an electrically heated gardeners plant propagator. With Clay type Kitty litter to absorb the oil that comes out of the wood so it does not have the chance to flow back in to the wood. Because the heating element is so low there is no chance of the propagator damaging the wood at all. The method is simple place the stock in the propagator and cover the most oiled parts completely with Kitty litter and turn on. Just for information the propagator in the p[hodographs has had gun stocks left heating for the largest part of a year with no ill efects.




_________________________
The only lessons in my life I truly did learn from where the ones I paid for!

Top
#576565 - 07/28/20 01:29 PM Re: Oil in wood? [Re: Texsss]
Texsss Offline
Boxlock

Registered: 08/27/14
Posts: 19
Well, I got most of the oil out. Below are pics of the finished product. That whiting compound sure gets nasty when it collects a bunch of oil!

Thanks for the help!



Top
#576567 - 07/28/20 03:15 PM Re: Oil in wood? [Re: Texsss]
battle Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 06/23/02
Posts: 1779
Loc: Versailles
That's the 2 incher I passed on. Looks like it cleaned up nice for you. Great job!

Top



doublegunshop.com home | Welcome | Sponsors & Advertisers | DoubleGun Rack | Doublegun Book Rack

Order or request info | Other Useful Information

Updated every minute of everyday!


Copyright (c) 1993 - 2019 doublegunshop.com. All rights reserved. doublegunshop.com - Bloomfield, NY 14469. USA These materials are provided by doublegunshop.com as a service to its customers and may be used for informational purposes only. doublegunshop.com assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions in these materials. THESE MATERIALS ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT-ABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. doublegunshop.com further does not warrant the accuracy or completeness of the information, text, graphics, links or other items contained within these materials. doublegunshop.com shall not be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, or consequential damages, including without limitation, lost revenues or lost profits, which may result from the use of these materials. doublegunshop.com may make changes to these materials, or to the products described therein, at any time without notice. doublegunshop.com makes no commitment to update the information contained herein. This is a public un-moderated forum participate at your own risk.

Note: The posting of Copyrighted material on this forum is prohibited without prior written consent of the Copyright holder. For specifics on Copyright Law and restrictions refer to: http://www.copyright.gov/laws/ - doublegunshop.com will not monitor nor will they be held liable for copyright violations presented on the BBS which is an open and un-moderated public forum.