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#602129 08/31/21 09:21 PM
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Nitrah Offline OP
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On one of my doubles the top screw, under the top lever, slowly works counter clockwise when shooting. It doesn't become loose but starts in that direction. I mentioned to a gunsmith, unfortunately he is a couple hours away, and he said it can be fixed by adding a very thin piece of wood , kind of like a shim. As he explained it the screw needs the tension it would have when tightened to keep it in place properly. Does this sound right and is it just a matter of adding a very thin piece right under the screw?


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I would suggest removing the screw and after cleaning the threads apply some blue Locktite to the threads and replace, tightening to where it is clocked. The blue Locktite is not permanent so the screw can be removed. I have little faith in the shim method. Under the head it might raise the screw enough to interfere with the closing of the top lever.


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That “screw” is commonly referred to as a “breech pin”.

I wonder why this gunsmith didn’t recommend using a drop of blue loctite? That would probably be the first thing I’d try. The piece of wood or shim recommendation seems silly to me, because that pin threads into the trigger plate, the threads are at the bottom of the pin. That shimming method works well with a wood screw for tightening things up, but not for a machine screw.

Try a drop of loctite. If that doesn’t do the trick, look into having another breech pin fitted up.

Btw…tighten the pin to where it’s actually tight. Not where it’s “timed” correctly. If you want a pin that is both tight and timed correctly, then have a new one turned and fitted.

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The screw loosens, likely because it does not have the original amount of tension.
What happened? The wood likely shrank a tiny bit.
Is adding a shim under the trigger plate or top tang wrong??
I've done that---
Very dumb, I guess.....


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Does the gun have double triggers, or single? If a single, be very careful not to over tighten the screw, also (I believe) sometimes referred to as the hand pin.

I second the use of blue Loctite. Don't use the red anyplace you can't apply heat to get it to release.


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To start Locktite is the perfect quick answer to this type of problem but there where days when Locktite was not available and there where other cures for this problem, some a little odd and others that can cause a sharp intake of breath. One of the best methods of re timing a screw I have ever found is some strands of coarse wire wool warped under the head and the screw is timed by removing or adding some strands. This works so well because the strands of wire wool act as a lock washer as well as adding depth keeping the screw in place. Adding Shellac to the screw thread and assembling acts like Locktite when it drys. Now for the sharp breath intake ones, place a piece of lead sheet on a hard surface next lay your screw on that next hit the screw lightly just enough to distort the thread on the hit side. In doing this the distorted threads will tighten the screw in the threaded hole it goes into. Last but not least Tin the thread with Solder this will increase the screw size and make the screw tight in the threaded hole. There are other methods like putting a length of copper wire in the hole before the screw. So Locktite really is an answer to a modern Engineers prayer's.


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Originally Posted by Stanton Hillis
Does the gun have double triggers, or single? If a single, be very careful not to over tighten the screw, also (I believe) sometimes referred to as the hand pin.

I second the use of blue Loctite. Don't use the red anyplace you can't apply heat to get it to release.

The hand pin is the pin that threads upward from the trigger plate into the rear of top tang. The hand pin head is usually hidden underneath the trigger guard tang, the end of the pin is filed flush with the top tang.

All of those pins should be tight. Those are the pins that hold your stock onto the gun. Loose breech and hand pins equal cracked stocks. I’ve never dealt with LC Smiths with HOT, so I don’t know about those, seems odd that you can’t tighten a pin down because it interferes with the operation of a trigger. What a quirk.

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Adding the shim is a perfectly appropriate old time fix, but it goes under the tang, not the screw head. Blue Locktite is fine too, but it may not address shrinkage.
Mike

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Originally Posted by LeFusil
That “screw” is commonly referred to as a “breech pin”.

I wonder why this gunsmith didn’t recommend using a drop of blue loctite? That would probably be the first thing I’d try. The piece of wood or shim recommendation seems silly to me, because that pin threads into the trigger plate, the threads are at the bottom of the pin. That shimming method works well with a wood screw for tightening things up, but not for a machine screw.

Try a drop of loctite. If that doesn’t do the trick, look into having another breech pin fitted up.

Btw…tighten the pin to where it’s actually tight. Not where it’s “timed” correctly. If you want a pin that is both tight and timed correctly, then have a new one turned and fitted.

I recall a gunsmith (I think Hugh Lomas) telling me that tight is more important than in proper alignment.

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Wondering why glass bedding screws hasn't been mentioned? I haven't bedded screws on a shotgun but I have done every bg game rifle I own when I bedded the actions. The screws tighten down to exactly the same place every time and I've never had them work loose. I've used it from a .338WinMag down to a .222Rem. and I've not seen any degrading of the glass from wear, recoil or other. I think it would stand up the repeated recoil of a shotgun.


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