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#645224 04/04/24 10:06 AM
Joined: Feb 2008
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Sidelock
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If you use a sanded-in finish, it can be very hard to stain the wood and maintain a consistent color as you sand. I always got dark spots where the stain absorbed more color than the wood did. Rather than apply stain to the wood, apply it to the finish. When you're ready to do the final top coats, lightly wipe on a coat of Laurel Mtn stain. Then gently wipe it off with a soft paper towel. The finish will darken with an even color. The finish will be softened somewhat but will set up overnight. I use Daly,s wood finishes but think this process will work with other products too.


Bill Ferguson
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Bill,
This is a subject I’ve been struggling with.
I see the same issue with sanding in finish to fill the grain. What you say about coloring the finish and over lay of stain is also true and I’ve used the process. But, I feel using that method does not give me the same results as what the stains applied before any finish. It seems more muddied. I’ve been using some highly figured black walnut with large pores that are tough to fill. I’ve had good results sanding finish in but loose any color I add and end up with more of a natural wood color. I would realy like to fill the grain first, sand, stain and then finish, but filling and not sealing the wood, somewhat anyway, has been an issue and the wood does not take the stain as raw wood does. I’m seeing talc, plaster of paris and rotten stone used as fillers. The rotten stone might be a little tough on checkering tools but I’m really curious if anyone uses any of these. I’m especially curious about the plaster of paris becuase I could add color to it, and I’m thinking it may not impede the absorption of any additional color I appliy. Been using alkenet with fairly good results in the finish, but I’m still not getting colors that I’m looking for.
Bob

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I have been adding color, Alkanet root powder, to my finish for some time now. I agree completely that if you are cutting back at all, that is the way to go in order to get a nice even color.

I have used a rotten stone slurry rubbed in with root powder and Daly's, it gives a wonderful finish and is indeed hard on checkering tools.

I find a few coats of Boiled Linseed Oil with Alkanet root powder giving me a darker color than if I just put the root powder in Daly's.

Always interested in hearing how other's go about things.


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Staining wood and dark absorbent spots giving a rather blotchy outcome has been problematical from the time man started colouring wood with stain. To try to improve things I do use an old school method to reduce darker patches becoming to obvious. To start cut the stain by 50% with it's solvent then working quickly go over the wood with the same solvent, this will lower the woods absorbency especially in the high absorbency patches then apply the cut down stain also working quickly then let dry. Keep working this way strengthening the stain mix until you obtain the depth of colour you require. It is a very simple method and with a little practice in not going over the more porous parts of the wood to many times with the stronger stain mix less darkening of the porous patches will result.


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1 member likes this: Stanton Hillis
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rwarren, You're right that the finish will take on a matte texture after the stain is wiped off. Using Daly's Ben Matte as a top coat, I find it easy to bring back as much shine as I want with just one or two coats over the stained surface. I wipe them on, wait a few minutes for the surface to become a bit tacky, then wipe down the stock with a soft paper towel. PS: You'll find thin shell walnut many times easier to finish than black.


Bill Ferguson
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Bill, for sure on finishing the English type walnuts. Although, I’m liking the figure I’ve been getting in the some of the black I’ve found. But, the pores are a pain to fill and I’m really looking to limit the loss of color as the finish progresses. The process I’m using to stain can’t be redone, from what I have found, if the color is lost while finishing. I don’t post pictures here, but if I could, I would show you the latest I’m working on, it’s a stunning piece of black.
Bob

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Originally Posted by rwarren
Bill,
This is a subject I’ve been struggling with.
I see the same issue with sanding in finish to fill the grain. What you say about coloring the finish and over lay of stain is also true and I’ve used the process. But, I feel using that method does not give me the same results as what the stains applied before any finish. It seems more muddied. I’ve been using some highly figured black walnut with large pores that are tough to fill. I’ve had good results sanding finish in but loose any color I add and end up with more of a natural wood color. I would realy like to fill the grain first, sand, stain and then finish, but filling and not sealing the wood, somewhat anyway, has been an issue and the wood does not take the stain as raw wood does. I’m seeing talc, plaster of paris and rotten stone used as fillers. The rotten stone might be a little tough on checkering tools but I’m really curious if anyone uses any of these. I’m especially curious about the plaster of paris becuase I could add color to it, and I’m thinking it may not impede the absorption of any additional color I appliy. Been using alkenet with fairly good results in the finish, but I’m still not getting colors that I’m looking for.
Bob

I have used rottenstone with Permalyn on California English. Doug Mann checkered it. I don't use rottenstone for filling anymore, but in looking a few of them, the rottenstone-filled pores seem a little more level with the wood than some of the others where it looks like the congealed slurry has oozed up a little bit, ie. the pores are very slightly proud of the wood where there has been a lot of wear on the finish. Not sure what to make of all of that.

I'm re-doing a stock right now with Velvit Oil #200 and no filler, and it is coming along very well

As for stains, I sometimes use a Laurel Mt. Forge red (cherry) stain that is in what smells like an alcohol solvent. It goes on very evenly when used on raw black walnut, but I use it in the second and subsequent coats on honey-colored English, just to be sure of evenness.

I'm just an amateur, but I'm happy with the results.


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